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Putting learned societies at the centre of the 'policy community'

Putting learned societies at the centre of the 'policy community'

With the potential to coordinate, influence and enable, it is perhaps a moral imperative for learned societies to organize themselves around the problems that face their communities and the wider public. With major global challenges ahead, we must act now to ensure our networks are primed to mobilise and tackle the emerging issues associated with a changing planet and an increasing population.

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Science communicators do it for the public

Science communicators do it for the public

At the British Science Association Science Communication Conference today (16 May) several sessions touched upon the importance of scientists accepting the significance of values, principles, and ideologies – their own and those of their ‘publics’. I was grateful for this, and particularly for Alice Bell’s contributions on the panel of a session on policy called ‘Hail to the Chief [Scientific Advisor]’.

Becoming a Google+ evangelist

I recently read What the plus! Google+ for the rest of us, by Guy Kawasaki. My aim was to see what a Google+ enthusiast could do to sell Google+ to me. Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love the idea of Google+ and lapped up the opportunity to get in on the second Beta stage of the platform in 2011 but, to be honest, I’ve not used it much since then. Well, I’m sold. And furthermore, I’d like to see scientists using it to build their online communities and engage with lay audiences.

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